Concise, critical reviews of books, exhibitions, and projects in all areas and periods of art history and visual studies

Reviews in caa.reviews are published continuously by CAA and Taylor & Francis, with the most recently published reviews listed below. Browse reviews based on geographic region, period or cultural sphere, or specialty (from 1998 to the present) using Review Categories in the sidebar, or by entering terms in the search bar above.

Recently Published Reviews

SoLA Contemporary, Los Angeles, July 2–August 15, 2020
When, in 2013, the Oakland, California–based, employee-owned creative firm Design Action Collective was tasked by Black Lives Matter (BLM) organizers Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi to create a visual identity for the incipient movement, the challenge was enormous. How to visually represent a movement that was an outgrowth of historic civil rights and progressive political protest movements? How to capture the energy and rage aimed at a fundamentally broken justice system, as well as instill hope for profound, systemic change? Daunting though the brief may have been, within three days Design Action Collective had produced a… Full Review
August 25, 2020
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Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves, eds.
Exh. cat. Minneapolis and Seattle: Minneapolis Institute of Art in association with University of Washington Press, 2019. 344 pp.; 400 color ills. Paper $39.95 (9780295745794)
Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, June 2–August 18, 2019; Frist Art Museum, Nashville, September 27, 2019–January 12, 2020; Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, February 21–May 17, 2020; Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, October 7, 2020–January 3, 2021
Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists celebrates the works of North American Indigenous women throughout history and into the present. In selecting the 117 objects included in the exhibition, the curators, Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves (Kiowa), were determined to provide a comprehensive display that represented all geographical areas and a wide variety of media, from beadwork and basketry to video and performance art. They were guided by a team of native and nonnative artists, scholars, and curators, not only in selecting the works for the exhibition but also in ensuring that the narrative they presented challenged some… Full Review
August 20, 2020
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. Today we highlight Outcasts: Prejudice & Persecution in the Medieval World, a 2018 Getty exhibition reviewed by Patricia Blessing. Full Review
August 19, 2020
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Let’s Start by Looking at Its Past, Sixty Years of Dissertations
Fig. 1 “Dissertations in Progress,” Art Journal 22, no. 3 (Spring 1963): 168 (published under fair use) In spring 1963, Art Journal,1 published by the  College Art Association (CAA), featured a new section, entitled “Dissertations in Progress.”2 It was introduced by a brief caveat that described the list as “tentative and incomplete” while promising that it would be augmented in future issues (Fig. 1). At that time, the editors of the journal could not have foreseen that this particular feature, which included dissertations being written at only five universities,  would remain a persistent yet greatly… Full Review
August 18, 2020
Michael Gaudio
Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. 224 pp.; 16 color ills.; 67 b/w ills. Cloth $120.00 (9781517907396)
Struck by lightning at his Philadelphia house in 1745, Benjamin Franklin’s friend Gilbert Tennent penned a sermon on God’s “Majestick Voice in the Thunder,” a warning to those disputing divine power over the wicked and the good. “Who can stand before this Holy Lord God,” Tennent wrote, “when once his Anger begins to burn?” Franklin himself was experimenting with electricity nearby, wielding rods and bells, harnessing invisibilities in less prophetic but equally noisy ways. The alternate poles of “enchantment or enlightenment” (ix), as Michael Gaudio’s brilliant new book argues, tacking between sensory deception and revelation, colored both men’s understanding of… Full Review
August 13, 2020
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. Today we travel to the Seattle Art Museum exhibition Figuring History: Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas in a review by Lacey Baradel. Full Review
August 12, 2020
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Anne Lafont
Dijon, France: Les presses du réel, 2019. 476 pp.; 132 color ills.; 8 b/w ills. Paper €32.00 (9782378960162)
The polysemous nature of the concept of race in the eighteenth century meant that while the term’s employment was widespread, its meaning was hardly fixed. Regardless, what united its many different usages was a consensus that it was defined by visual traits, thus making the visual arts one of the most important disseminators and delineators of racial information. As Anne Lafont states in her impressively researched and comprehensive L’art et la race: Race is indeed anchored in the body regardless of the will of those who are its carriers. . . . Its absence of categorical fixity during the… Full Review
August 11, 2020
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Elizabeth Otto and Patrick Rössler
New York: Herbert Press, 2019. 192 pp.; 200 ills. Cloth $40.00 (9781912217960)
Elizabeth Otto and Patrick Rössler’s Bauhaus Women: A Global Perspective tells the stories of forty-five female designers, artists, and architects who graduated from the renowned Bauhaus school of design, architecture, and applied arts. Each story offers an invigorating look at the artist’s process, exploring art and life as well as the confronting of self and society. The juxtaposition of these artists’ paradoxical dilemmas between individuality and cultural collectivity demonstrates that they deserve deeper understanding from us. They connect the Bauhaus to the wider world, as asserted by the authors—even though they do not clarify the specific ways such a connection… Full Review
August 6, 2020
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. This week we revisit the exhibition Per(sister): Incarcerated Women of Louisiana with Jillian Hernandez. Full Review
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Suheyla Takesh and Lynn Gumpert, eds.
Exh. cat. New York and Munich: Grey Art Gallery in association with Hirmer Publishers, 2020. 256 pp.; 162 color ills. Cloth $50.00 (9783777434285)
Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York, January 14–April 4, 2020; McMullen Museum of Art at Boston College, January 25–June 6, 2021; Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Ithaca, New York, February 5–June 12, 2022
Writing in 1964, the Algerian painter Mohammed Khadda (1930–1991) identified “that day in 1910 when the Russian artist [Wassily] Kandinsky created the first nonrepresentational work” as marking the birth of “nonfigurative (or abstract) painting.” (Note: For the sake of consistency, I have used the exhibition curators’ transliteration of artists’ names.) Published in Révolution africaine, the National Liberation Front’s weekly newspaper, Khadda’s piece was the first of three artists’ statements titled “Éléments pour un art nouveau” (Elements for a new art), in which the authors grappled with the question of the role of the artist in the postindependence state. While… Full Review
August 4, 2020
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. Today’s highlight is Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories by Amelia Jones and Erin Silver, reviewed by Alison Syme. Full Review
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. Today we spotlight Kate Flint’s discussion of The Tiger in the Smoke: Art and Culture in Post-War Britain by Lynda Nead. Full Review
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FROM THE ARCHIVE: This summer, caa.reviews is revisiting reviews that relate to the social issues of the present, at a time when the field is taking them up in renewed ways. First up, Erin Silver considers Exist Otherwise: The Life and Works of Claude Cahun by Jennifer L. Shaw. Full Review
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Christina Weyl
New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2019. 296 pp.; 76 color ills.; 63 b/w ills. Cloth $65.00 (9780300238501)
A current and valuable effort in art history is the examination of a well-known topic with greater attention to the contributions of women and other marginalized individuals. This expansion of familiar narratives is grounded not in rewriting historical facts but in rehabilitating figures—whether they be artists, gallery owners, curators, or collectors—who have been largely or even entirely overlooked, not only to shed light on their accomplishments but also to establish a broader understanding of a moment in time, which allows for a deeper historical account. Christina Weyl’s book The Women of Atelier 17, focused on women artists working at… Full Review
July 23, 2020
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Sarah L. Eckhardt
Exh. cat. Richmond, VA and Durham, NC: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in association with Duke University Press, 2020. 260 pp.; 140 ills. Cloth $40.00 (9781934351178)
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, February 1–October 18, 2020; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, dates to be announced; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, dates to be announced; Cincinnati Art Museum, Spring 2022
The history of the Kamoinge Workshop, a group of Black photographers founded in 1960s Harlem, is documented and analyzed from multiple, beautifully blended perspectives in this important, substantial book. I had expected to study it after viewing the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) exhibition for which it serves as a catalog. However, shortly after the exhibition opened, the venue was closed to the public, another museum casualty of COVID-19. Louis Draper, the founding member and mainstay of the collective, wrote in his history of the workshop: “‘Kamoinge’ is derived from the Kikuyu [a language of Kenya]… Full Review
July 21, 2020
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