Concise, critical reviews of books, exhibitions, and projects in all areas and periods of art history and visual studies

Reviews in caa.reviews are published continuously by CAA and Taylor & Francis, with the most recently published reviews listed below. Browse reviews based on geographic region, period or cultural sphere, or specialty (from 1998 to the present) using Review Categories in the sidebar, or by entering terms in the search bar above.

Recently Published Reviews

Edward J. Sullivan
Exh. cat. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014. 208 pp.; 81 color ills.; 18 b/w ills. Cloth $60.00 (9780300203202)
Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, June 14‒September 6, 2015. Brooklyn Museum, New York, October 2, 2015‒January 3, 2016. Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, San Juan, January 29‒April 24, 2016
Edward Sullivan’s book-length disquisition on Francisco Oller is an engaging narrative that traverses a wide historical range, from the personal to the national to the transnational and to artworks and their histories. Oller, whom Sullivan describes as the most prominent Caribbean artist of the nineteenth century, lived and painted during a period of intense social and political transformation. Born in 1833 in Puerto Rico to a father who had migrated there from Spain, Oller... Full Review
April 6, 2018
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Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University
East Lansing: Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, 2017.
Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at MSU, April 29–October 22, 2017
The Transported Man, curated by Marc-Olivier Wahler, director of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, posited metaphorically that art is magic. He did not mean that art is supernatural but that the process of making art—as the transfiguration of the common place—is like an act of stage magic. Through its analogy with magic, the show placed a curious spin on such established art-historical notions as illusionism, dematerialization, the ready-made, art as process, and art as... Full Review
April 5, 2018
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Montclair Art Museum
Montclair, NJ: Montclair Art Museum, 2017.
Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey, February 5–June 18, 2017
An exhibition devoted to tracing an artist’s cross-cultural influence often bears the risk of trying to do too much. Featuring sixty-five works, Matisse and American Art at the Montclair Art Museum juxtaposed nineteen paintings and works on paper by Matisse with a vast selection of objects by thirty-four American artists. With works by artists as diverse as Arthur Dove, Andy Warhol, and Faith Ringgold, exhibition organizers aimed to explore the French master’s impact on American... Full Review
April 5, 2018
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Kellie Jones
Durham: Duke University Press, 2017. 416 pp.; 32 color ills.; 93 ills. Paperback $29.95 (9780822361640)
Kellie Jones’s South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s illuminates a blind spot in existing histories of contemporary art in Los Angeles. Those who know Los Angeles know that the area “south of Pico”—dominated by the north-south arteries of Central and Crenshaw avenues, which connect the neighborhoods of Watts, Compton, Leimert Park, and Baldwin Hills—has historically been the center of black life in the city. As Jones writes,... Full Review
April 5, 2018
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Simon Kelly and Esther Bell
Exh. cat. New York: Prestel, 2017. 296 pp.; 197 color ills.; 45 b/w ills. Hardcover $75.00 (9783791356211)
Saint Louis Art Museum, February 12–May 7, 2017; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Legion of Honor, June 24–September 24, 2017
Given that in recent decades many scholars have called for attention to the diverse traditions and overlooked contributions of a global art history, it is fair to ask, do we need another major exhibition devoted to Impressionism? There have been French Impressionist studies penned by a coterie of distinguished scholars across the globe that should satisfy most any methodological perspective or preference for a certain theme or stylistic practice. Recent shows have explored subthemes... Full Review
April 4, 2018
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Zainab Bahrani
New York: Thames & Hudson, 2016. 376 pp.; 414 ills. Paper $87.50 (9780500292754)
When teaching a course on the art of Mesopotamia, perhaps the greatest challenge has been the absence of a current textbook on the subject. As Zainab Bahrani notes in her introduction, “since the mid-twentieth century, books on Mesopotamian art have fallen out of favor” (8). This lack may be explained by the opinion of some scholars that the ancient Near East produced no art at all, on the assumption that the category of “art” excludes objects created for other purposes. The standard text... Full Review
April 4, 2018
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Yve-Alain Bois
Paris: Cahiers d'Art, 2015. 383 pp.; 450 color ills.; 483 b/w ills. Cloth $395.00 (9782851171900)
In late December 2015, American abstract master Ellsworth Kelly passed away at the age of 92. A month and a half before his death, Kelly had said to The Guardian that he “want[ed] to live another 15 years.” This zest for life came from his unwavering commitment to art making. In a career that spanned almost seven decades, Kelly produced over 1150 paintings, reliefs, sculptures, and large-scale commissions—works of bold shape and color that reveal his distinctive approach to... Full Review
April 4, 2018
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Gregory Battcock
Ed. Joseph Grigely. Cologne, Germany: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2016. 224 pp.; 38 color ills. Paperback $28.00 (9783863359331)
In the present cultural moment, the unearthing of previously obscure queer heroes is a much-needed balm to the rightward swing of the political pendulum. When asked to write this review, I admittedly came seeking some of that particular brand of soothing. I approached Joseph Grigely’s edited volume Oceans of Love: The Uncontainable Gregory Battcock as a curiosity of those heady days of queer New York, before the pall of the plague years descended upon us all. My experience of... Full Review
April 3, 2018
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Charmaine A. Nelson
New York: Routledge, 2016. 416 pp.; 16 color ills.; 26 b/w ills. Hardcover $128.00 (9781409468912)
In the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts appears a portrait of an Afro-Caribbean woman bearing a platter of tropical fruit and seated in front of a mountainous landscape. She is likely Marie-Thérèse Zémire, enslaved in Haiti and then in Montreal by the Québec-born François Malépart de Beaucourt. Beaucourt, an artist by trade, painted Zémire in 1786. The painting was originally titled Portrait of a Negro Slave and was renamed Portrait of a Haitian Woman by museum curators in the... Full Review
April 3, 2018
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Janet Bishop and Katherine Rothkopf, eds.
Exh. cat. New York: Prestel, 2016. 184 pp.; 120 color ills.; 14 b/w ills. Hardcover $49.95 (9783791355344)
Baltimore Museum of Art, October 23, 2016–January 29, 2017; SFMOMA, March 11–May 29, 2017
An ambitious exhibition, Matisse/Diebenkorn delivers on its goal to delineate the influence of Henri Matisse (1869–1954) on Richard Diebenkorn (1922–93), showing a remarkably significant number of parallels between two modern, avant-garde artists. However, it does much more, and not only in its review of Diebenkorn: it also provides a nuanced consideration of the concept of influence, thereby making a significant contribution to the field of American art, as well as comparative... Full Review
April 3, 2018
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